Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is a type of anxiety disorder that is characterized by an intense feeling of fear in public places, where people are gathering, or even in enclosed spaces that seem to be overcrowded. While the condition is not logical, anyone who suffers from this condition cannot use logic to make their anxiety stop.

It is as if the people who feel this fear cannot escape, and their anxiety will only grow larger the more that they avoid things that scare them. People who are agoraphobic often develop this condition after a panic attack because they are very concerned about having another panic attack. The fear grows over time as the sufferer worries about all the places, scenarios, or conditions that could trigger them.

An agoraphobic patient will avoid public places, and they will not feel safe even if they are with someone they trust. It helps to have some accompany them on any outing, but it can be so intense that an agoraphobic person cannot leave their home. Just the thought of leaving the house and being outside with a lot of people is terrifying.

Symptoms

Someone who is agoraphobic could suffer from a range of symptoms. These symptoms do not need to all be present for this condition to be present. If you have noticed these issues in yourself or someone else, you cannot automatically diagnose the condition. However, it may be helpful to speak to a therapist, counselor, or psychiatrist who can help. Common issues related to this condition include:

  • A fear of leaving the house by yourself
  • Being afraid of standing in line by yourself
  • Fear of any enclosed space like a movie theater, store, office, or even bathroom.
  • A fear of parking lots, bridges, malls, docks, and boardwalks where people could suddenly gather at any moment.
  • A fear of using any sort of public transit like trains, buses, or planes. Of course, the bus station, airport, or train station will be terrifying because it is either full or could fill up quickly.

These situations are scary for agoraphobic people because they feel like they cannot escape, reach out to someone for help, or protect themselves. Someone who is in a situation like this could cause many other problems such as shaking, crying, and weakness to the point that the sufferer needs to sit down.

Anyone who is agoraphobic also suffers from:

  • Fear related to their exposure to the situation. This could be the idea of going into an open or crowded place, seeing a place like that on TV, or even planning a schedule that could take them to that place.
  • The fear and anxiety that you feel are very out of proportion with the danger that you would be in. As mentioned above, this is not a logical condition, and people simply cannot use logic to solve the problem.
  • These situations are distressing even if you go with a companion or avoid them because the very idea of being in a situation like this is scary.
  • The issue can make it difficult to work and socialize to the point where you need to work exclusively in the home and avoid or even quit jobs when you need o to be out in public or a crowded office.
  • The avoidance and fear lasts more than six months in most cases.

How Do Panic Disorders Intersect With This Condition?

Panic disorders and agoraphobic feelings are often co-morbid because a panic attack can be a big part of the agoraphobic experience. Someone who is overcome with anxiety could easily have a panic attack. In fact, a panic attack could be the reason that these agoraphobic feelings have intensified. For example, someone who had a panic attack at a crowded train station will feel as though another panic attack is coming on any time they go to a place that reminds them of that train station.

The fear that people feel forces them to avoid all situations that could cause a panic attack, and they will continue to isolate themselves for their own safety. This is especially significant because panic attacks are exhausting. People who are afraid of a panic attack are also afraid of the aftermath.

Because panic attacks could strike at any time, you need to understand how they come about. You can learn how to protect yourself by understanding these warning signs of a panic attack, addressing the situation, and learning coping techniques that will help you live your life normally. These warning signs could be ignored as situational issues, but they are often precursors to a panic attack:

  • An accelerated heartbeat
  • Difficulty breathing or the inability to swallow almost as if you are choking
  • Chest pain or heaviness that you cannot explains
  • A feeling of lightheadedness or that the room is spinning
  • Shaking, trembling, or even numbness in your extremities
  • Feeling flushed or having sudden chills
  • A bad feeling in the pit of your stomach that makes you feel sick
  • Feeling as though you are losing control of your life and the situation
  • A sudden fear of death

When Should Patients Go To The Doctor?

If you feel that you are limited by the issues noted above, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor, a psychiatrist, therapist, or counselor for help.

How Do You Treat It?

You can be treated with therapy, medication, and an immersion program that is guided by a licensed professional. Someone who has sought out professional help should work with that professional over many years to learn how to manage their condition. People who do not seek help cannot manage this condition on their own.

What Is Life Like For Anyone Who Suffers From This Condition?

Agoraphobic warning signs might also be associated with conditions like:

  • Depression
  • Alcoholism
  • Personality and anxiety disorders

Anyone who has been diagnosed needs to know how their life can change because of their anxiety. These people might feel compelled to self-medicate, or they might be depressed because of their anxiety. These people might develop personality disorders because of their condition, and these patients must work with professional therapists or doctors to address these conditions.

Can This Condition Be Prevented?

There is no way to prevent this condition, but you should ask a friend or family member to help you if you need to seek professional care. That person can help you by taking you to appointments, and they can also help you with medication reminders, accountability, and support.

Do not allow the condition to get worse over time as you withdraw from society out do not seek out treatment.

How many suffer in the United States

0.9% of the population suffers from this condition, but the mental health establishment does not always notice this condition first. The condition may be preceded by panic attacks or other problems that will lead a mental health professional to this diagnosis.

What Is The Disability Rating?

This condition has been given a disability rating of 70%. This rating is very high because the condition can prevent sufferers from leaving their homes, maintaining gainful employment, and enjoying companionship.

What Causes This Condition?

Anyone who has this condition could have developed it for a number of reasons. Some risk factors for this condition include:

  • A genetic predisposition to anxiety disorders or panic disorders
  • Stress
  • Singular experiences that cause the condition to develop quickly such as panic attacks

This condition can start in your teens and 20s, and it usually starts showing itself before the age of 35. Also, women tend to be diagnosed with this condition more than men.

Conclusion

Agoraphobia is a serious condition that requires treatment and support. You should reach out to a medical professional as soon as possible for therapy, medication, and other forms of counseling.

For More Information

Agoraphobia – Symptoms and causes

Agoraphobia (ag-uh-ruh-FOE-be-uh) is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. You fear an actual or anticipated situation, such as using public transportation, being in open or enclosed spaces, standing in line, or being in a crowd.

Agoraphobia

Anxiety

Agoraphobia is a type of anxiety disorder that is characterized by an intense feeling of fear in public places, where people are gathering, or even in enclosed spaces that seem to be overcrowded. While the condition is not logical, anyone who suffers from this condition cannot use logic to make their anxiety stop.

Fear

It is as if the people who feel this fear cannot escape, and their anxiety will only grow larger the more that they avoid things that scare them. People who are agoraphobic often develop this condition after a panic attack because they are very concerned about having another panic attack. The fear grows over time as the sufferer worries about all the places, scenarios, or conditions that could trigger them.

Avoidance

An agoraphobic patient will avoid public places, and they will not feel safe even if they are with someone they trust. It helps to have some accompany them on any outing, but it can be so intense that an agoraphobic person cannot leave their home. Just the thought of leaving the house and being outside with a lot of people is terrifying.

Symptoms

Someone who is agoraphobic could suffer from a range of symptoms. These symptoms do not need to all be present for this condition to be present. If you have noticed these issues in yourself or someone else, you cannot automatically diagnose the condition. However, it may be helpful to speak to a therapist, counselor, or psychiatrist who can help. Common issues related to this condition include:

  • A fear of leaving the house by yourself
  • Being afraid of standing in line by yourself
  • Fear of any enclosed space like a movie theater, store, office, or even bathroom.
  • A fear of parking lots, bridges, malls, docks, and boardwalks where people could suddenly gather at any moment.
  • A fear of using any sort of public transit like trains, buses, or planes. Of course, the bus station, airport, or train station will be terrifying because it is either full or could fill up quickly.

Escape

These situations are scary for agoraphobic people because they feel like they cannot escape, reach out to someone for help, or protect themselves. Someone who is in a situation like this could cause many other problems such as shaking, crying, and weakness to the point that the sufferer needs to sit down.

Anyone who is agoraphobic also suffers from:

  • Fear related to their exposure to the situation. This could be the idea of going into an open or crowded place, seeing a place like that on TV, or even planning a schedule that could take them to that place.
  • The fear and anxiety that you feel are very out of proportion with the danger that you would be in. As mentioned above, this is not a logical condition, and people simply cannot use logic to solve the problem.
  • These situations are distressing even if you go with a companion or avoid them because the very idea of being in a situation like this is scary.
  • The issue can make it difficult to work and socialize to the point where you need to work exclusively in the home and avoid or even quit jobs when you need o to be out in public or a crowded office.
  • The avoidance and fear lasts more than six months in most cases.

How Do Panic Disorders Intersect With This Condition?

Panic disorders and agoraphobic feelings are often co-morbid because a panic attack can be a big part of the agoraphobic experience. Someone who is overcome with anxiety could easily have a panic attack. In fact, a panic attack could be the reason that these agoraphobic feelings have intensified. For example, someone who had a panic attack at a crowded train station will feel as though another panic attack is coming on any time they go to a place that reminds them of that train station.

The fear that people feel forces them to avoid all situations that could cause a panic attack, and they will continue to isolate themselves for their own safety. This is especially significant because panic attacks are exhausting. People who are afraid of a panic attack are also afraid of the aftermath.

Because panic attacks could strike at any time, you need to understand how they come about. You can learn how to protect yourself by understanding these warning signs of a panic attack, addressing the situation, and learning coping techniques that will help you live your life normally. These warning signs could be ignored as situational issues, but they are often precursors to a panic attack:

  • An accelerated heartbeat
  • Difficulty breathing or the inability to swallow almost as if you are choking
  • Chest pain or heaviness that you cannot explains
  • A feeling of lightheadedness or that the room is spinning
  • Shaking, trembling, or even numbness in your extremities
  • Feeling flushed or having sudden chills
  • A bad feeling in the pit of your stomach that makes you feel sick
  • Feeling as though you are losing control of your life and the situation
  • A sudden fear of death

When Should Patients Go To The Doctor?

If you feel that you are limited by the issues noted above, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor, a psychiatrist, therapist, or counselor for help.

How Do You Treat It?

You can be treated with therapy, medication, and an immersion program that is guided by a licensed professional. Someone who has sought out professional help should work with that professional over many years to learn how to manage their condition. People who do not seek help cannot manage this condition on their own.

Moon neecee b author mental illness agoraphobia

What Is Life Like For Anyone Who Suffers From This Condition?

Agoraphobic warning signs might also be associated with conditions like:

  • Depression
  • Alcoholism
  • Personality and anxiety disorders

Anyone who has been diagnosed needs to know how their life can change because of their anxiety. These people might feel compelled to self-medicate, or they might be depressed because of their anxiety. These people might develop personality disorders because of their condition, and these patients must work with professional therapists or doctors to address these conditions.

Can This Condition Be Prevented?

There is no way to prevent this condition, but you should ask a friend or family member to help you if you need to seek professional care. That person can help you by taking you to appointments, and they can also help you with medication reminders, accountability, and support.

Do not allow the condition to get worse over time as you withdraw from society out do not seek out treatment.

How many suffer in the United States

0.9% of the population suffers from this condition, but the mental health establishment does not always notice this condition first. The condition may be preceded by panic attacks or other problems that will lead a mental health professional to this diagnosis.

What Is The Disability Rating?

This condition has been given a disability rating of 70%. This rating is very high because the condition can prevent sufferers from leaving their homes, maintaining gainful employment, and enjoying companionship.

What Causes This Condition?

Anyone who has this condition could have developed it for a number of reasons. Some risk factors for this condition include:

  • A genetic predisposition to anxiety disorders or panic disorders
  • Stress
  • Singular experiences that cause the condition to develop quickly such as panic attacks

This condition can start in your teens and 20s, and it usually starts showing itself before the age of 35. Also, women tend to be diagnosed with this condition more than men.

Conclusion

Agoraphobia is a serious condition that requires treatment and support. You should reach out to a medical professional as soon as possible for therapy, medication, and other forms of counseling.

Agoraphobia – Symptoms and causes

Agoraphobia (ag-uh-ruh-FOE-be-uh) is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. You fear an actual or anticipated situation, such as using public transportation, being in open or enclosed spaces, standing in line, or being in a crowd

n the last year I have left my house a handful of times. At the worst points I didn’t leave my bedroom. I just felt comfortable, and the thought of leaving would trigger anxiety that would build up. This condition can destroy your perception of reality. I have lost contact with so many people in the last few years due to mental health issues. I’m sharing a case with you now of another instance of agoraphobia.

Agoraphobia

Case Study

Agoraphobia is an anxiety disorder where sufferers avoid situations that cause them to panic. It can even turn into a disability, making patients such as Mrs. E. L (a 91-year-old woman) afraid to leave their home.

Fear Of Death

Mrs. E. L’s agoraphobia was tied to her fear of death, also known as thanatophobia. These two phobias are often associated with each other. Mrs. E. L’s phobia led her to believe that leaving her bed would cause her to be buried alive or hurt.

Getting Help

With the help of mental health professionals, Mrs. E. L was able to eventually leave her bed. While she still struggled with going outside, her agoraphobia lessened in severity and she was able to leave her home.

Disability

While agoraphobia can be a disability, it does not have to be a permanent one. With proper help, sufferers are able to achieve great improvement. Consistent, gradual exposure therapy has been found to have successful results in improving agoraphobia.

Mental Health

Poor mental health can directly or indirectly cause poor physical health as well. Mrs. E. L had physical issues such as cataracts and anemia that had gone untreated because her agoraphobia limited her from going to the hospital.

Exposure Therapy

Mrs. E. L had seen success with her exposure therapy. At no point during treatment did she experience a relapse with the severity of her agoraphobia. Instead, she continued to make improvements. She went from being bedridden to leaving her room.

Tight Hold

Agoraphobia has a tight hold on its sufferers. Even though Mrs. E. L was in the next room from her husband, she was unable to check on him when he didn’t respond to her. Instead of going to check on him, she called 911.

Many Theories

There are many theories about what causes agoraphobia. Clinicians and therapists have observed that other anxiety disorders, environmental causes, and substance abuse are often correlated with agoraphobia. The amygdala may also be to blame.

Anxiety

Separation anxiety is common with agoraphobia. Mrs. E. L would experience great anxiety when left alone. She would stay with her brother while her husband worked to avoid being alone. After a while, she forbid her husband from leaving the house as well.

Conclusion

The strange case of Mrs. E. L proves that sufferers of agoraphobia can improve with proper treatment. While it may take years to see a big improvement, the positive impact of exposure therapy on mental health is undeniable.

Agoraphobia – Symptoms and causes For More Information I have Included A Link Below.

Agoraphobia (ag-uh-ruh-FOE-be-uh) is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. You fear an actual or anticipated situation, such as using public transportation, being in open or enclosed spaces, standing in line, or being in a crowd.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/agoraphobia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355987

3 thoughts on “Agoraphobia And Me”

  1. I was diagnosed with agoraphobia and social anxiety disorder which triggered episodes of psychosis. The best combination of strategies for managing it for me was graded exposure and leaving my instructive anxiety thoughts alone to run there course. Whenever I challenged my thoughts my anxiety would get worse until I had a psychotic episode and detached from reality, but when I left them unchallenged, the cycle of thoughts each anxiety episode would eventually stop and my anxiety would reduce, and after a while they became far easier to live with. Although it is psychologically painful to leave these thoughts to run their course, but the long term benefits are worth it as the thoughts lose power with each successful attempt of leaving them unchallenged. At least for me it did anyway

  2. I have lived my whole life with emotions that usually didn’t fit the scenario. My coping skill was to assign the feeling to a memory. This was mostly disastrous in reality, although it took years to realize I was doing it. Personally when I get a thought in my head I have to say it. The negative thoughts where so counter productive to relationships. Come to find out it is a form of OCD. I’m usually very social but when faced with situations I couldn’t control (I’m a control freak) I shut down. That combined with ongoing chronic pain has led to a couple of years of agoraphobic behaviour. Currently I’m improving. Medication does help me.

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